Journal of

Case Reports and Images in Surgery

 
     
Case Report
 
Hepatic abscess secondary to the accidental ingestion and lodgment of dental wires in the large bowel: A case report
Tzu-Yi Chuang1, Andrew Thomas Sax2, Emelia Dauway3, Stefaan De Clercq3
1Surgical Registrar, Department of General Surgery, Gladstone Base Hospital, Gladstone, Queensland, Australia
2Medical Student, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
3Surgical Consultant, Department of General Surgery, Gladstone Base Hospital, Gladstone, Queensland, Australia

Article ID: 100053Z12TC2018
doi:10.5348/100053Z12TC2018CR

Address correspondence to:
Andrew Thomas Sax,
1/73 Memorial Avenue, Maroochydore,
Queensland, Australia, 4558

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How to cite this article
Chuang TY, Sax AT, Dauway E, Clercq SD. Hepatic abscess secondary to the accidental ingestion and lodgment of dental wires in the large bowel: A case report. J Case Rep Images Surg 2018;4:100053Z12TC2018.


ABSTRACT

Introduction: Pyogenic hepatic abscess secondary to migration and perforation of the gastrointestinal tract by an ingested foreign object is extremely uncommon.
Case Report: This report presents an unusual case of a healthy 25-year-old young male who developed a hepatic abscess subsequent to the ingestion of dental wires, which became lodged in the splenic flexure of the colon. The patient denied any history of swallowing a foreign body. He presented when clinical signs of a hepatic abscess had developed. On microscopy, the specimen revealed Streptococcus milleri 3+. The patient was successfully treated with metronidazole, percutaneous drainage of the abscess, and snare removal of the dental wires.
Conclusion: To our knowledge, only one other case report detailing a hepatic abscess secondary to ingested dental wires has been published. As such, more established protocols for the management of an atypical hepatic abscess are required.

Keywords: Foreign body, Hepatic abscess, Dental wire, Perforation


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Author Contributions
Tzu-Yi Chuang – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Acquisition of data, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Andrew Thomas Sax – Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Emelia Dauway – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Acquisition of data, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Stefaan De Clercq – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Acquisition of data, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Guarantor of submission
The corresponding author is the guarantor of submission.
Source of support
None
Consent Statement
Written informed consent was obtained from the patient for publication of this case report.
Conflict of interest
Authors declare no conflict of interest.
Copyright
© 2018 Tzu-Yi Chuang et al. This article is distributed of Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided the original author(s) and original publisher are properly credited. Please see the copyright policy on the journal website for more information.



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