Case Report
 
Concurrent treatment of metastatic breast and metastatic renal cell carcinoma: A case report
Sarah Jane Zardawi1, Mathew Kattathra George2
1MBBS B Med Sci, Advanced Trainee, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Calvary Mater Hospital, Waratah, 2298, NSW, Australia
2DM FRACP MSc, Adjunct Associate Professor, Staff Specialist in Medical Oncology and General Medicine, North West Cancer Center, Tamworth Rural Referral Hospital, NSW, Australia

Article ID: 100054Z10SZ2018
doi: 10.5348/100054Z10SZ2018CR

Corresponding Author:
Sarah Jane Zardawi
Calvary Mater Newcastle
Waratah, NSW, Australia, 2298

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How to cite this article
Zardawi SJ, George MK. Concurrent treatment of metastatic breast and metastatic renal cell carcinoma: A case report. J Case Rep Images Oncology 2018;4:100054Z10SZ2018.


ABSTRACT

Introduction: Breast and renal carcinomas are common malignancies, with an increasing number of well-tolerated targeted therapies.

Case Report: We describe a case of concurrent, synchronous, metastatic breast and renal carcinomas where diagnosis was achieved after biopsy of two incongruous metastatic sites. The patient has been successfully treated with targeted therapies, exemestane and sunitinib, and later anastrozole and pazopanib, with radiological improvement and resolution of symptoms.

Conclusion: Literature review of cases of antecedent, synchronous and metachronous breast and renal cancers (multiple malignancies), did not reveal increased risk of developing renal cancer after breast cancer, or of breast cancer after renal cancer. Cases of multiple breast and renal cancers appear to occur at any time with out clear reasons for their occurrence. This case demonstrates the importance of appropriate investigation and accurate diagnosis of synchronous malignancies in patients who may be candidates for treatment targeted therapies. As clinical experience of concurrent use of targeted therapies grows, including trials for potential additive benefits of using targeted agents in combination, we will be able to offer improved treatment options for patients with both single and multiple malignancies.

Keywords: Multiple malignancies, Targeted therapies


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Acknowledgements
Brianna Wright, Christopher Renaud, Susan Pendlebury.
Author Contributions
Sarah Jane Zardawi – Acquisition of data, Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Mathew Kattathra George – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Guarantor of Submission
The corresponding author is the guarantor of submission.
Source of Support
None
Consent Statement
Written informed consent was obtained from the patient for publication of this case report.
Conflict of Interest
Author declares no conflict of interest.
Copyright
© 2018 Sarah Jane Zardawi et al. This article is distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided the original author(s) and original publisher are properly credited. Please see the copyright policy on the journal website for more information.