Journal of

Case Reports and Images in Medicine

 
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Case Report
 
Celebration gone wrong: A case of foreign body ingestion related to a military promotion ceremony
Jacob Mathew1, Calvin Parker III1
1Department of Internal Medicine, Tripler Army Medical Center.

Article ID: 100017Z09JM2016
doi:10.5348/Z09-2016-17-CR-10

Address correspondence to:
Jacob Mathew
Jr. DO CPT, MC, Department of Internal Medicine
Tripler Army Medical Center

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How to cite this article:
Mathew J, Parker III C. Celebration gone wrong: A case of foreign body ingestion related to a military promotion ceremony. J Case Rep Images Med 2016;2:40–43.


Abstract
Introduction: It has been reported that every year, over 1500 deaths have been attributed to foreign body aspiration in adults. Most foreign body ingestions in adults occur during eating, while in the pediatric population, toys and magnets are the common culprits. Delay in diagnosis is common given that patients may only present with a cough and be mislabeled as having asthma or an upper respiratory infection. As a result, a high index of suspicion for foreign body aspiration must be present to allow for timely identification and treatment. If noted to be in the gastrointestinal tract, endoscopy is often employed due to its reported 95% successful retrieval rate.
Case Report: We present a case of 26-year-old active duty soldier who was found to have aspirated a foreign object during a promotion ceremony. Urgent endoscopy with a roth net was utilized and successful in removing the object.
Conclusion: Initial evaluation should focus on the patient's respiratory status to include choking, drooling, wheezing, and bloody saliva to determine if urgent intubation is required for airway protection. While in the past, foreign object removal required a surgical procedure, endoscopy has now stepped up as a suitable non-invasive alternative in many cases.

Keywords: Cough, Foreign body ingestion, Pediatric population, Roth net


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Author Contributions
Jacob Mathew – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Acquisition of data, Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Calvin Parker III – Analysis and interpretation of data, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Guarantor of submission
The corresponding author is the guarantor of submission.
Source of support
None
Conflict of interest
Authors declare no conflict of interest.
Copyright
© 2016 Jacob Mathew et al. This article is distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided the original author(s) and original publisher are properly credited. Please see the copyright policy on the journal website for more information.



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